Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Nature begins to reclaim!

The red is in the rust! See more Ruby Red at: http://willthink4wine.blogspot.com/ and http://workofthepoet.blogspot.com/
According to Weki, "Storage silos are cylindrical structures, typically 10 to 90 ft (4 to 30 m) in diameter and 30 to 275 ft (10 to 84 m) in height with the slipform and Jumpform concrete silos being the larger diameter and taller silos. They can be made of many materials. Wood staves, concrete staves, cast concrete, and steel panels have all been used, and have varying cost, durability, and airtightness tradeoffs. Silos storing grain, cement and woodchips are typically unloaded with air slides or augers. Silos can be unloaded into rail cars, trucks or conveyors.
Tower silos containing silage are usually unloaded from the top of the pile, originally by hand using a pitchfork, in modern times using mechanical unloaders. Bottom silo unloaders are utilized at times but have problems with difficulty of repair.
An advantage of tower silos is that the silage tends to pack well due to its own weight, except in the top few feet. The tower silo was invented by Franklin Hiram King.
In Australia, many country towns in grain-growing areas have concrete tower silos to collect grain from the surrounding towns and store it ready for transport by train or road to an export port.


I found this Silo in Jones County, MS. As you can see, vegatation has begun to overtake this structure. It is the beginning of the decay process that, over many years, will reclaim these materials back into the surrounding landscape. Webster defines this process as, "to break up into constituent parts by or as if by a chemical process."

Most people think of decomposition in the context of a body and are saddened by it. I am saddened by the process occuring here becuase it is a different kind of loss. It is a loss of our history.

This building is further along the path to none exixtence. At some point many years ago, this was someone's home. It has rotted into a shell of what it used to be. As you can see, the forest is reclaiming the land around it. It's fate is sealed! This structure sits in southeast Hinds County near the Poison Ivy Ranch, my home!
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56 comments:

The Woman said...

That's neat. There's an old barn across the way I should take a picture of it

Kasie said...

Gorgeous gorgeous photos. My husband and I are in to photographing old architecture so I just love this. Thanks for sharing.

HFD60 said...

Nice photo's...it's a shame to see old structures like that just rotting away...

fishing guy said...

Michael: Nicely done, I enjoy the history involved in old buildings.

Stanley said...

Nice pictures =) It reminds me of the "Simpsons Movie" where Homer kept pig dung in a silo!

dot said...

Old silos make great pictures. I like the rust and the vine...could it be kudzu?

The Birdlady said...

Very cool, Michael - hope the bad guys are taking a break from being bad and you can get some relief.

Alex said...

Hey...thanks for stopping by. I was starting to wonder where you were at!!

I also love the pictures of the silos...it reminds me of growing up and missing how some things in life used to be.

Marcel said...

From earth to earth.
101, man that would kill me!

Indrani said...

Great informative post, we have lots of monuments crumbling down in the same manner!

Alex said...

I have been sick for 3 weeks...not able to keep food down. Lost 15 pounds now. Tests showed a large tumor on my liver. I go in for surgery tomorrow and will find out by the end of the week if it is cancerous or not. Here is a link to my regular blog for updates:

http://urluckyitsme.blogspot.com/

ellen b. said...

Michael,
These are fabulous shots! The information you offer is very interesting, too. Do you have a lot of Poison Ivy on your ranch?

michele said...

These are great, honey! They seem to mean so much more when I'm with you as you take them. I can't wait to see the rest! See you in a few minutees! LOL

irish daisies said...

very nice shots. you did a great job again

Carletta said...

Wonderful photos of the old silo.

juliana said...

rust has a certain appeal, doesn't it. and i suppose decaying is a natural process in all things.
love the photos

Babs (Beetle) said...

Rust is an original idea for ruby Tuesday :O)

Lovely photos.

Dianne said...

the red in rust is a great title and I really appreciate all the interesting information that goes with your photos

beautiful nature shots, I like the idea of manmade structures being reclaimed by nature - heaven knows we owe her a lot :)

the teach said...

Great post for Ruby Tuesday Michael! Great lesson in the process of returning to the landscape! Rust is indeed red and some orange! Happy RT to you! :)

the teach said...

Ran into a problem when I tried to post my comment Michael. Hope you got it! Great Ruby Tuesday post! :)

April said...

Enjoyed your post and pictures! I like the vine growing around the silo - it looks pretty. Your wonderful photographs will also help to preserve the memories of bygone times.

Jim said...

Mine isn't red, it is a Wordless Wednesday that came from a red place. Think cows, I won't say more.
Happy R(R)T! Thanks for peeking in even if I wasn't red.
..

Old Wom Tigley said...

This is a great post and the information is excellent. I feel just the same when I see history disappearing or left to decay.

Real good read

Tom

***Fotografia e Luz*** said...

Very interesting pictures of the silos and how to explain the meaning a hug

a said...

Having lived in farmland not to long ago and with a generational farm in my family...the sizes of the silo on the land tell a story all in themselves. sometimes you will see the first silo of the homestead and with each generation a newer taller one built next to it:) when you see a farm with 3 or more silos on it you know that farm has been around for a very very long time..especially if you can still see the original homestead on it. Silos, well my grandpa's silo anyway...it survived and f5 tornado....he lost everything else that day and had to rebuild it all...I remember never being allowed in the silo..it was too dangerous. I adore the photo with the greenery on it...I love old homesteads.

marcia said...

your post is just how I like things old and rusty

jientje said...

I love old rusty things, and I enjoyed the pictures on your blog, like the squirel for instance?

Tommy v said...

I like this series of pictures.

Carver said...

It is sad to see the loss of history but there is something beautiful to me about old buildings, barns, silos which are no longer used. They still can retain their beauty although no longer functional. These shots are quite appealing to me. I appreciated your visit to my blog.

Travis said...

Great photos. I love old silos. Beautiful in a way if you ask me. Nice post!

Travis said...

Would you like to exchange links? I have added you to my links list.. you can do the same if you would like.

Patti said...

The silo is a good choice for the red that may be the antithesis of the shiny Ruby, that of course being Rust.

You wonder what cash crop used to fill up the silo...and grew on the land. A metaphor for the elimination of our agrarian past?

Ralph said...

I loves silos, even if abandoned to nature

Michele (Rocky Mtn.Girl) said...

Nice photos and good information... I like how that ivy or what vegetation seems to be creeping along the sides of it... sort of picturesque.

Madison Richards said...

Thank you for your kind words... especially about the Fairy Tale!

I'm so sorry the ending has been so long in coming! It IS coming, I assure you. I promise I'll announce it on the main blog when I write the next installment. I've been on vacation and very busy with life in general. The next week or two promises some great writing time though, so stay tuned, if you will!!

Your humble and overwhelmed author,
Madison Richards :)

Odat said...

What a great idea for Ruby Tuesday...Great shots....great blog!
Peace

Lady Di Tn said...

I think it would be wonderful if you could locate a photo when the silo was in it's hay day and with people and animals about and do you wonder who sat on the porch and sipped tea. Ah, if those old rocks could talk. The stories they would tell. Peace

Gayle said...

Very nice. I like the vegetation on the sides...adds such character.

Kim said...

I love old Silos and old buildings. They definitely make for interesting pictures.

Linda Reeder said...

Ashes to ashes,
Dust to dust,
But first comes rust!

Hi. I just made that up. Seemed fitting.
I love old barns and silos. I grew up in the Willammette Valley in Oregon, and there are lots of these places. They have stories to tell.

RAMOSFOREST.ENVIRONMENT said...

Great shot and report.

Rachel* said...

these are really cool photos! ive never seen anything like that, and i love the green vines growing along the sides!

Marja said...

Great pictures. Luckily here the start to protect more and more old buildings

Tink *~*~* said...

Now that's a really unique Ruby Tuesday. Love old buildings, thanks for sharing.

Tink *~*~*
My Mobile Adventures *~*~*

Becky and Gary said...

Great, great post ! With most of the farmers in our area using those big plastic tubes to store silage on the ground, you don't see the old silos so much any more. Peerfect Ruby Tuesday.

Strider said...

The modern definition is "grain elevator". I'm in the agricultural business, and the silos and elevators are vital parts of the Ag economy. When I was a kid, Dad and I built a wooden grainery (silo) for on farm wheat storage. I liked your post. It's nice to keep accounts of this kind of history. blessings

Edward S Gault said...

This Silo has a lot of duende.
You really captured the essence of it.
Thank you for shariing this, and for the visit.

Askew To You said...

Great shots. :D It looks like the vines are hugging it in the second shot.

Thank you for visiting A Cook's Bounty today.

The Urban Buddha said...

Real nice shots! Love all the different angles! Thanks for sharing. Have a great day! :)

NAELA said...

Beautiful pictures and great post!
You seem to speak very well spanish, I am sorry I write in Portuguese...
Sweet kisses;)

Chrysalis Angel said...

I love how you wrote up some of the history and put in the links. The one site's "Wordless Wednesday" was beautiful.

The Texican said...

Still blogging. Those are good Michael. Glad you got the visit in the "Free State of Jones". Pappy

Louise said...

I just saw a similar post somewhere else recently. The history lost IS sad, and I always wonder about the people who lived in places like that. How many were in the family? What did they do with their time besides work?

The silo pictures are wonderful.

Andrea said...

I like old things. They make the best pictures. You captures these well. Great post to go with the grat shots.

Tipper said...

There are several old silos around where I live. A few have been kept up-but most are like the one you showed-slowly decaying and disappearing. I love the old house-makes me wish I could peek into the window and see who lived there and what they use to do.

Texas Travelers said...

Thanks for sharing the great photos and information.

I have been going through your older posts and really enjoying them.

I have added you to my "Nature Blogs" blogroll.

I'll be back later and catch up some more.

Troy

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